Extractive Industries in Africa | Addressing Conflicts and Integrating Sustainable Development

Extractive IEXTRACTIVE INDUSTRIES IN AFRICA | Addressing Conflicts and Integrating Sustainable Development

Elias Omondi Opongo, SJ (Ed.)

Extractive industry in Africa has emerged as an important sector that continues to shape the socio-economic and political landscape of the continent. The industry includes mining, oil and gas resources. Africa holds 30% of world's mineral reserves,
10% of the world's oil and 8% of the global natural gas. A large part of these resources are yet to be fully exploited. This means that the production is not yet at its full capacity.

More and more African countries are confronted with new demands in extractive industries that call for equity, environmental safety, corporate social responsibility, social rights of the local populations, and transparency in the handling of contracts, taxation and development of well-informed policies.
The key issue of concern is whether Africa's natural resources can be translated into economic growth and sustainability.

Elias Omondi Opongo, SJ (Ed.) is the director of Hekima Institute of Peace Studies and International Relations (HIPSIR). He is a conflict analyst and peace practitioner with a research focus on transitional justice and post conflict reconstruction, religious extremism, state building and community peacebuilding. He holds a PhD in Peace and Conflict Studies from University of Bradford, UK and MA in International Peace Studies from University of Notre Dame, USA. He has published books, book chapters and articles on conflict resolution, transitional justice, peacebuilding and Catholic Social Teaching.